What are cookies?

Our site uses cookies. A cookie is a small text marker stored on your computer that enables us to track the use of our website. We use cookies to help us understand what our users' interests and preferences are to ensure the website is as user friendly as possible.

This site only uses cookies in order to provide a service to visitors. No personal data is stored in cookies and cookies are not used in order to provide advertising. Cookies are used for the following purposes:

Learn more about cookies on aboutcookies.org

If you have any concerns about the processing of your personal data by the Dementia Action Alliance, please contact the Secretariat, c/o Alzheimer's Society, 43-44 Crutched Friars, London, EC3N 2AE.

Accept and continue

Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Updated:
23 June 2016
Location:
North West
Sectors:
Health, Medical, Care, Hospitals and Hospital Trusts
Local Alliances:
Manchester Dementia Action Alliance

1. Action Plan

1. The National Dementia Declaration lists seven outcomes that the DAA are seeking to achieve for people with dementia and their carers. How would you describe your organisation’s role in delivering better outcomes for people with dementia and their carers?

At Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust we remain firmly committed to ensuring the highest levels of patient safety and clinical quality and this is reflected in our three key priorities which are:

  • Patient Safety and Clinical Quality
  • Patient and Staff Experience
  • Productivity and Efficiency

Our quality strategy underpins everything we do and enables us to set targets and monitor their impact. We have developed our own Improving Quality Programme to ensure continuous improvement by front line staff. We are committed to improving care for people living with dementia and have used this methodology to develop and drive our changes. 

Our role in delivering better outcomes for people with dementia and their carers is focused on the experiences of patients in an acute hospital. As such we have initiated a number of changes including:

  • Forget-Me-Not flower - a Find, Assess, Investigate and Refer system within our electronic systems so that patients identified as having cognitive impairment can be flagged to all staff, enabling specific care needs to be met
  • Remember Me – a specific shared care plan for patients living with a diagnosis of dementia, and their carers, to enable carers to work in partnership with hospital staff in meeting the individual needs of each patient during their hospital stay. This has been developed jointly by hospital staff and carers. It encourages an individualised approach from nursing staff when planning care and enables patients to have a level of personal choice and control in decisions about their care.
  • A medical lead for dementia and a multi-professional steering group that focuses on ensuring dementia specific changes become Trust wide and fully incorporated into the way we design services
  • Providing carers with links to support services, charities and other help external to the acute trust
  • A training programme – to support staff in ensuring patients and their carers get adequate information. The training programme includes various levels from raising awareness via mandatory e-learning for all staff to train the trainer programmes
  • Improving the healing environment in the acute hospital to ensure patients feel supported and understood whilst clinically unwell. This has included large scale changes to hospital décor, art work, activities and simple extras such as calendar and clocks
  • Establishing the Forget-Me-Not focus group for carers to work alongside the improvement team to influence the changes being made.

2. What are the challenges to delivering these outcomes from the perspective of your organisation?

The challenges we face in delivering these outcomes include:

  • Awareness that the acute hospital environment at times does not provide an environment that is enabling and supportive.
  • Operational pressures and competing priorities.
  • Due to the number of staff at CMFT it is difficult to ensure that all the dementia specific care is delivered consistently

 

 

 

 

Member contacts

www.cmft.nhs.uk 

2. Actions

  • Improving the hospital environment

    Incorporating dementia friendly designs in the life cycling estates work and planning small bespoke projects for wards with high numbers of patients with dementia

    Status:
    Being implemented

    Update - First Quarter

    Nothing to report - new DAA member

    Update - Second Quarter

    N/A

    Update - Third Quarter

    November 2014 update Dementia friendly design guide has been produced and now influences any environmental changes on all our hospital wards and outpatient departments. Two wards are currently developing dementia friendly environments with the support of charitable funds

  • Ensuring workforce capability in caring for people living with dementia

    Roll out of dementia training for all staff is planned for 2013/14 as part of the mandatory courses – e-learning package to be introduced by July 2013

    Status:
    Delivery

    Update - First Quarter

    Nothing to report - new DAA member

    Update - Second Quarter

    N/A

    Update - Third Quarter

    N/A

    November 2014 update A dementia e-learning package has been developed and this year 620 members of staff from all staff groups have accessed the course. CMFT offer a range of different approaches to increase dementia awareness: as part of clinical induction programmes when new staff join the Trust, bespoke sessions to other members of the multi-disciplinary team and a full dementia care study day.
  • Raising awareness of the importance of good dementia care

    We are planning events throughout the year to raise awareness and ensure dementia is given a high priority despite operational pressures, including dementia awareness week, medical staff training, and implementation of electronic flagging so that all clinical and management staff are aware of where dementia patients are being cared for

    Status:
    Delivered

    Update - First Quarter

    Nothing to report - new DAA member

    Update - Second Quarter

    N/A

    Update - Third Quarter

    N/A

    November 2014 update CMFT during Dementia awareness week in May held a Grand Exhibition showcasing the improvements in dementia care across all hospital divisions including Trafford hospital. Professor Alistair Burns spoke at the event and over 250 people attended the day. Systems are now in place to highlight where people with dementia are being cared for throughout the hospital and a process to investigate any cognitive impairment for people aged 75 years and over.