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Yasmine Van Owen Life Skills Therapist

I am committed to providing holistic complementary therapy, coaching and support as a brief intervention or long term assistance in a safe and caring environment, free from judgment or prejudice to enable people to live life to their full potential.

Updated:
2 February 2017
Location:
East of England
Sectors:
Health
Local Alliances:
Stowmarket Dementia Action Alliance

1. Action Plan

1. The National Dementia Declaration lists seven outcomes that the DAA are seeking to achieve for people with dementia and their carers. How would you describe your organisation’s role in delivering better outcomes for people with dementia and their carers?

As a Life Skills Therapist, I have a range of ways in which I assist different population groups.  For those with Dementia, it is long term support work, assisting sufferers with activities they wish to persue outside the home, motivating them to continue socializing, exercising, participating and providing mental stimulation as their condition deteriorates in order to slow down this process as much as possible,  My role also extends to those who have a caring role, ensuring that their mental well being is looked after and assisting them with adjustments, both physical and psychological as well as ensuring that both parties have access to other services and information.  My work is not restricted to certain hours or days so this flexibility means that if there is a sudden change of circumstance I am able to accommodate this.

2. What are the challenges to delivering these outcomes from the perspective of your organisation?

My practice is above all else flexible and holistic.  This translates in to a service tailored to the individual.  Dementia sufferers are individuals and as such their needs are diverse.  Being prepared for this diversity and the sometimes very swift  progression of the condition is a real challenge.  It helps to be well informed about the different aspects of the condition, so that questions can be answered truthfully, while accuracy remains absent.  At times personal choice for those with dementia becomes challenging for those who care for them and as a mentor it is often difficult to remain supportive to both sufferer and carer in equal measure as dementia progresses and cognitive, physical and reasoning ability diminish.

2. Actions