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Home Instead Senior Care Bromley, Chislehurst and Orpington

At Home Instead Senior Care, we provide non-medical care to older people so that they can continue to live in their own homes where they are most happy and comfortable. We treat all of our clients with love, compassion and dignity giving their families and friends the confidence that their loved ones are in excellent hands. Building strong relationships with our clients is central to our philosophy, and we do this by devoting at least an hour to our clients on each visit and by ensuring that our clients always know who will be visiting and when. All of our caregivers are carefully chosen and we ensure that they have the right training to deliver high quality care. In particular, we offer City and Guilds accredited Alzheimer’s and other dementia training to enable our caregivers to understand and manage the symptoms and behaviours associated with dementia.

Updated:
17 December 2015
Location:
London
Sectors:
Social Care
Local Alliances:
Bromley Dementia Action Alliance

1. Action Plan

1. The National Dementia Declaration lists seven outcomes that the DAA are seeking to achieve for people with dementia and their carers. How would you describe your organisation’s role in delivering better outcomes for people with dementia and their carers?

Continuity of care and an understanding of someone’s very specific dementia is what we focus on at Home Instead. Knowing an individual’s symptoms and behaviours and working with them to lead as normal and independent a life as possible is key. Companionship support based on client / caregiver matching, continuity of care and an understanding of someone’s very specific dementia is at the heart of everything we do. This puts us in a strong position to deliver better outcomes for people living with dementia.

We will continue to run workshops in the local community to help develop a wider understanding on what it is like to live with dementia, both for the people with dementia and their carers.

 We also have a City and Guilds Accredited Dementia Training Course that our caregivers go on. This gives them a real understanding of what it is like to have Dementia and also to care for someone with it.

2. What are the challenges to delivering these outcomes from the perspective of your organisation?

The biggest challenge we face is changing the way people think of and view those with dementia. To make people look at the whole person beneath the dementia, to think about their life and their past experiences. To treat the person who has dementia with respect and dignity at all times no matter what their behaviour. Awareness and understanding of dementia and the people affected is low amongst the general public and within local businesses and retailers.

 Awareness and understanding of what effective and affordable specialised dementia care at home looks like is also low and we are constantly challenged by the notion that people living with dementia should automatically be encouraged to cease living at home and consider residential care home options. Local residents also do not always know how/where to access best advice/training on dementia related issues.

 The more our clients and their family and friends know about the disease and understand that we know how to look after someone appropriately, we are able to overcome most challenges.

2. Actions

  • Use Dementia Friends Champion's training experience to make more Dementia Friends

    Run regular training sessions for staff, and amongst the community, to enlist as many Dementia Friends as possible.

    Status:
    Delivery

    2015 - Fourth Quarter Update

    New member

  • 2. Run ‘Understanding Dementia’ Workshops for family and friends of our clients

    Promote our ‘Understanding Dementia’ workshops amongst the family and friends of our clients. The workshops seek to develop a better understanding of what people living with dementia are going through so that friends and family can provide better support.

    Status:
    Delivery

    2015 - Fourth Quarter Update

    New member

  • Encourage more caregivers to take the City & Guilds Alzheimer’s and Dementia qualification

    Staff will be encouraged to receive further intensive training to a City and Guilds accredited programme designed to further their develop skills and knowledge in supporting people with dementia. We aim to provide the most comprehensive dementia support training programme to our staff of any local provider.

    Status:
    Delivery

    2015 - Fourth Quarter Update

    New member

  • Develop information resources

    Develop further our understanding of local support groups and organizations that might provide resources to persons with dementia, their carers, friends and family and develop links with key contacts. This will enable us signpost relevant organisations to individuals and organisations that we come into contact with. We will also work closely and build relationships with other members of the DAA to make it easier for people to get access to the services they need.

    Status:
    Delivery

    2015 - Fourth Quarter Update

    New member