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The Fed

The Fed is one of the North West of England’s oldest Jewish charities which has been operating since 1867. We deliver a high quality range of social care services including mental health support, carer’s respite breaks, community café, Children’s centre, as well as independent living, residential and nursing care, volunteer support, end of life care and dementia support. Together these make up one fantastic charity which is not replicated anywhere else in the UK. Our organisation is diverse, looking after people of all ages, from the whole spectrum of the community - the vulnerable, the disabled, the abused and neglected. The organisation helps 1,250 people on average at any one time from people with mental health issues to Holocaust survivors. Our achievements are made evident by full CQC compliance and an “excellent” rating by Bury Local Authority. Of our 180 care home residents, typically 75% have dementia, exhibiting significant confusion & other cognitive impairments. The average age of our residents is 88 years old & many are frail & have significant care needs. The Fed offers support for those who live in their own homes but need extra care during the day-time. Our day services offer care, companionship & stimulating activities in our warm, vibrant care village, & are suitable for people with varying levels of care needs, including people living with dementia. Although we are a Jewish care provider, our services are available to people of any faith or no faith. As well as taking part in activities, those attending day services can book our bathing service, make an appointment with our hairdresser, purchase laundry services or buy a meal to take home. Nursing & Residential services are managed by our Clinical Director, who is a RN/RM/RSN (Registered Nurse, Registered Midwife & Registered School Nurse). All of our 150 staff have or are working toward a level 2 with 58 of these also holding or working toward a level 3 or higher qualification.

Updated:
12 August 2015
Location:
North West
Sectors:
Care, Health, Voluntary Sector
Local Alliances:
Manchester Dementia Action Alliance , Bury Dementia Action Alliance, Salford Dementia Action Alliance

1. Action Plan

1. The National Dementia Declaration lists seven outcomes that the DAA are seeking to achieve for people with dementia and their carers. How would you describe your organisation’s role in delivering better outcomes for people with dementia and their carers?

The Fed has an excellent track record at supporting people with dementia & wishes to create and maintain a dementia friendly community. Our vision is for our care village to be utilised as shared community resource, a place where people carry on living, as opposed to an unfamiliar alien place where older people live & ultimately pass away. Our staff are skilled at applying the principles of person centred care, acknowledging the whole person, including their individual strengths, qualities & experiences. This contributes to maintaining a person’s identity & ensuring that their desires are followed wherever possible. We are aiming to relieve the anxiety, confusion & often considerable anger that people with  dementia  can  experience  by  providing  an  environment  that  is  safe,  familiar  &  human;  an almost-normal home where people are surrounded by things they recognise & by other people with backgrounds, interests & values similar to their own.

 

The outcomes that we aim to achieve for our residents with dementia and their families are;

  • Work to improve relationships between staff, residents, family members and the wider community as a whole
  • To reduce the social isolation and loneliness felt by those who have undergone a forced separation from the wider community through entering residential care.
  • To encourage and enable residents to maintain their sense of identity through the use of personal centred care.
  • To provide a range of stimulating activities to residents that ensure they are kept stimulated and happy during their time with us.
  • To ensure people with dementia have the best life possible
  • To help families prepare for the changes their loved one might experience during their journey with dementia

To improve communication between staff, families and residents.

 

The Fed works with a range of stakeholders including the four Local Authorities within our footprint, with whom we have partnership agreements; Salford City Council, Bury Council, Trafford Borough Council & Manchester City Council. We work with third sector & community groups, Synagogues, GP surgeries, Clinical Commissioning Groups & other health bodies. This also includes; C’hai Cancer Care, Marie Curie, MacMillan, Carers Centres, CAB. We work with Salford CVS & are part of the Salford 3rd Sector Consortium, which is a structured legal entity & have participated in consortium bids on occasion. All of the listed organisations make referrals to our service & work closely with us. We have strong links with the Salford Institute for Dementia and also Nordoff Robbins. In September an MA music therapy graduate will be starting a 7 month placement with us undertaking music therapy with our residents and other service users. We regularly employ dementia specialists across the site including Chava Rosenzweig, an art therapist who works with Holocaust Survivors who also have dementia.

2. What are the challenges to delivering these outcomes from the perspective of your organisation?

As a registered charity we receive no statutory funding for much of our work so are reliant on raising voluntary income to support our services. This presents a huge challenge as it can be difficult to raise sufficient funds to deliver all of the services we wish to provide

Whilst all of our team have had specialist training in dementia, there is currently no member of staff employed as a ‘dementia expert’. 

Member website

www.thefed.org.uk

2. Actions

  • Introduce a 'Dementia Champion into the organisation

    We are seeking funding to employ a ‘Dementia Champion’. The post would help to ensure that the skills & knowledge around dementia care are continuously maintained, improved & embedded into the culture of the organisation. They would be an advocate for residents & would support & encourage staff. They would need expertise & competence in the care of people with dementia. Introducing this post would mean that we can augment the learning from specialist training provided to staff & ensure that it is applied on a daily basis. The Dementia Champion would assume a principal position in augmenting the identification, knowledge & comprehension of dementia within the workforce. Families tell us that they would greatly appreciate the opportunity to have a named dementia specialist who would be a single point of contact for any issues relating to their relatives care. The Dementia Champion would encourage members of the wider community to come into our care village & be part of the work we do here, by volunteering, or visiting our cafe or group activities.

    Status:
    Planning

    2015 - Second Quarter Update

    Add new note.

  • Training for families in communication

    We plan to deliver a training programme for families to help them learn ways of communicating with loved ones who have dementia. The training will help them to understand dementia and its challenges and also ways of communicating appropriately. 

    Status:
    Planning

    2015 - Second Quarter Update

    Add new note.

  • Music Therapy for people with dementia

    In September 2015 we will employ an MA Graduate in Music Therapy from Nordoff Robbins to deliver music therapy sessions to people with dementia. The Therapist would work with people on an individual basis or in groups, proving music therapy. They will also work with staff in terms of developing their own musical abilities so that they are able to better support residents using music therapy. They will mentor staff and help develop their confidence and maximise their contribution. The project aims to help people with dementia communicate. We will measure the social impact of this project using social accounting and audit. 

    Status:
    Implementation

    2015 - Second Quarter Update

    Add new note.

  • Training for volunteers in how to support people with dementia

    We wish to provide training for volunteers in how to support those caring for someone with dementia. We would like to develop ‘Dementia Ambassador’ roles – for carers who have experience of caring for someone with dementia, who would draw on their experience to support others in a similar role.

    Status:
    Planning

    2015 - Second Quarter Update

    Add new note.

  • Dementia Care Houses and Gardens

    We are remodelling our care home accommodation for people with dementia as well as the outside space to create dementia friendly environments.

    Status:
    Planning

    2015 - Second Quarter Update

    Add new note.

  • Intergenerational Project with Manchester Metropolitan University

    We are developing an intergenerational project with colleagues from Manchester Metropolitan University. The project aims to bring older people with dementia and children together to undertake a range of activities including painting, cooking, singing, etc. The project aims to address two key problems. Firstly that of keeping people with dementia suitably stimulated and entertained, and secondly the stereotypes that exist around older people, aging and dementia. It will address the problem of social isolation and loneliness for those who have undergone a forced separation from the wider community through entering residential care.  The project will also seek to address the issue of polarisation between the young generation and an aging population.

    Status:
    Planning

    2015 - Second Quarter Update

    Add new note.