Riccall Care

Riccall Care provides friendly reliable home care workers to support people in their own homes. Having support and assistance in their own home gives people peace of mind and reassurance, because they are supported and cared for in familiar surroundings. Riccall Care Domiciliary Care Agency was created in 1998 by directors Gill and Tony Conroy. Still independent and family run, the team has now grown to around 180 - 200 directly employed care workers including an experienced care management team based in company owned offices just outside York. We have the skills to care individually for our clients and the expertise to handle complex care needs. We treat our clients as individuals with respect and dignity and concentrate on matching their specific needs with the skills of our valued care support workers.

Updated:
13 March 2017
Location:
Yorkshire and Humber
Local Alliances:
York Dementia Action Alliance, Yorkshire & Humber Dementia Action Alliance

1. Action Plan

1. The National Dementia Declaration lists seven outcomes that the DAA are seeking to achieve for people with dementia and their carers. How would you describe your organisation’s role in delivering better outcomes for people with dementia and their carers?

During the initial assessment every client or their advocate has the opportunity to express their specific care needs which is recorded on the detailed Support Plan. Every client has a dedicated care coordinator who is familiar with their circumstances and wishes.

Clients can liaise by phone directly with their named coordinator at any time throughout the provision of the service to discuss any changes to their care they may require. This direct accessibility allows for a flexible approach to the delivery of care to be adopted and we do our utmost to accommodate client’s requests

Treating clients with dignity and respect underpins everything we do at Riccall Care.  Our carer induction and training packages are designed to promote person centered care, ensure that clients are treated as individuals, encourage maximum independence, are given privacy when required and are involved in care decisions to promote self-esteem, social inclusion and reduced loneliness.

Our in house training facility enables us to respond to training needs in a very timely manner and assists us with developing a multi-skilled workforce. Every carer is given the opportunity to enhance their skills and knowledge with more specialised training i.e. Level 2 Mental Health, dementia, Activity Coordinating.

2. What are the challenges to delivering these outcomes from the perspective of your organisation?

Delayed Diagnosis of Dementia

Many sufferers of dementia live in the community either alone or with informal carers.  Diagnosis is often slow with some symptoms being put down to ‘old age’ which can lead to the person with dementia not receiving the right type of support, appropriate medication and access to a range of services and support which would assist them and their family. 

Care home workers can encounter problems around the language used in care planning, communication and delivery of care in cases where dementia has not been diagnosed.

Training of Workforce

Provision of great quality care services to dementia sufferers requires significant investment by our Company in the training and ongoing support of our workforce in order to put training into every day practice. This involves not only the investment in ‘Training the Trainers’ but also allowing time for shadowing out in the community, frequent supervision and mentoring by our senior team. 

There is a distinct lack of funding available to support external qualifications in this specialist field to enable a quality service to be delivered to those with dementia.

Member website

www.riccallcarers.co.uk

2. Actions

  • To ensure that all our carers promote Dignity in every aspect of their work

    To coincide with Dignity Action Day on 1st February 2015 we are encouraging all Riccall Care employees, both office and community based, to sign up to become Dignity Champions.

    By doing so they will all pledge to challenge poor care, to act as good role models and, through specific guidelines issued by the campaign, to educate and inform all those working around them.

    A Dignity Champion will:

    • Stand up and challenge disrespectful behaviour
    • Act as a good role model by treating people with respect, especially those who are less able to stand up for themselves
    • Speak up about dignity to improve the way that services are organised and delivered
    • Influence and inform colleagues
    • Listen to and understand the views and experiences of citizens
    Status:
    Delivery
  • To support our local community by offering free advice and information on caring for those with dementia

    As part of our commitment to the community that supports us, one of our goals for 2015 is the creation of a free resource for local residents that will deliver care information, guidance and practical support around home care.

    With an open door policy to anyone seeking help, we are delighted to launch Riccall Care Community Link.

    To begin in March, Riccall Care Community Link will be a series of regular free and informal ‘drop in’ events with an open invitation to anyone who would like to know more about caring for those with dementia in their own homes  

    Hosted by our highly trained and experienced care team members and based at our headquarters at Escrick Business Park.  Each session will offer the opportunity to speak to an expert on home care for advice and include a seminar on a key aspect of care at home including issues around dementia, health, well-being, funding and support - for the cared for and the carer.

    Status:
    Delivery
  • To ensure that all our carers receive excellent dementia training

    We have recently funded one of our Training team to undertake Dementia Care Matters– Level 6 Diploma in “Culture Change in Dementia Care “ and an accredited dementia course is currently being designed with the aim of: 

    1.      Dismantling standardised medical dementia care thinking.

    2.      Creating ‘Humanity in Dementia Care’ thinking.

    3.      Understanding ‘Challenging Behaviours’  

    4.      Coaching on how to be a ‘Dementia Travelling Companion’ in 5 easy steps.

    5.      Creating individual carer action plans to translate training to practice.

    Status:
    Delivery