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Basildon & Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

In April 2004, we became one of the first ten NHS foundation trusts in the country, with the creation of a Council of Governors comprising local elected members meaning we could work much more closely with our local community to address and deliver their needs. Local people, patients and staff can become members of the Trust and have a say in the healthcare services we provide. We have more than 10,000 public members and 4,000 staff members. Foundation status gives us have more control over how we spend our money and plan our services. We remain firmly part of the NHS and are subject to NHS standards, performance ratings and inspections. We are accountable to our Council of Governors and regulated by the independent regulator of foundation trusts, Monitor.

Updated:
2 November 2014
Location:
East of England
Sectors:
Medical, Health, Care, Hospitals and Hospital Trusts

1. Action Plan

1. The National Dementia Declaration lists seven outcomes that the DAA are seeking to achieve for people with dementia and their carers. How would you describe your organisation’s role in delivering better outcomes for people with dementia and their carers?

The Trust wants to improve the whole experience of coming into hospital.  We recognise that the current environment is not ideally suited to the needs of people with dementia and that we need to build a culture and competencies among our staff to deliver appropriate care that does not disadvantage or exclude people with cognitive or physical impairment.

We have started a process of service improvement but we feel we can do more and are planning to establish three beacon dementia care wards, where practice is excellent and learning can be shared across all services within the Trust.

We believe that as an acute hospital we have a crucial role in breaking down barriers to accessing healthcare and can give greater support to the carers of people with dementia.  Our Trust can also make a useful contribution in the early identification, investigation and onward referral of people in the early stages of dementia.

2. What are the challenges to delivering these outcomes from the perspective of your organisation?

Hospitals have not traditionally been designed to cater for the needs of people with dementia. The environment is busy with intense pressures on capacity and a need for timely discharge home.  The physical needs and dependency of our patients is complex and requires significant skills, care and compassion from our staff.

We recognise that this places pressure on our aim to provide a calm healing environment where the individual needs of people can be consistently met at the highest standard.

2. Actions

  • Support delivery of improved education and training

    Our first aim is to support the delivery of improved education and training on dementia for our staff, recognising the quality of the Trust workforce is critical to the successful implementation of our local Dementia Strategy. 

    Status:
    Initial Scoping

    2014 - First Quarter Update

    In progress

    2013 - Fourth Quarter Update

    In progress

    2013 - Third Quarter Update

    In progress

    2013 - Second Quarter Update

    New member

  • To improve engagement with families and carers

    Our second aim is to improve engagement with families and carers to understand how we can better and more appropriately care for people with dementia.  We understand that families and carers are a rich resource and we want to improve our engagement with them and incorporate their knowledge and understanding of their relative/partner/friend into our plan of care.

    Status:
    Initial Scoping

    2014 - First Quarter Update

    In progress

    2013 - Fourth Quarter Update

    In progress

    2013 - Third Quarter Update

    In progress

    2013 - Second Quarter Update

    New member

  • Recognise early signs of dementia

    Our third aim recognises the early signs of dementia can be difficult and it takes time to make a diagnosis. We want to ensure our staff understand that an assessment based on a good knowledge of the person affected as well as a careful consideration of physical factors are identified. The process of diagnosis must be accompanied by sensitive support and compassion as people affected and their families start to understand the longer-term implications of the condition.

    Status:
    Initial Scoping

    2014 - First Quarter Update

    In progress

    2013 - Fourth Quarter Update

    In progress

    2013 - Third Quarter Update

    In progress

    2013 - Second Quarter Update

    New member

  • Improve approach to patient care

    Our fourth aim is to improve our approach to patient care taking account of the individual needs of people living with dementia and the needs of their families and carers.  While we use care planning the current system does not adequately take account of the importance of understanding the individual in the context of how their dementia affects them and the specific limitations it imposes. 

    Status:
    Initial Scoping

    2014 - First Quarter Update

    In progress

    2013 - Fourth Quarter Update

    In progress

    2013 - Third Quarter Update

    In progress

    2013 - Second Quarter Update

    New member

  • Improve patient experience via improved environments

    Our fifth aim is to improve patient experience by creating an environment that promotes independence, is less confusing and has familiar reference points to help patients with dementia orientate themselves to hospital.  We recognise that there is a balance between providing a safe clinically appropriate environment able to meet the acute health needs of our patients and an environment that is calm and conducive to recovery and rehabilitation and in some cases palliative care.

    Status:
    Initial Scoping

    2014 - First Quarter Update

    In progress

    2013 - Fourth Quarter Update

    In progress

    2013 - Third Quarter Update

    In progress

    2013 - Second Quarter Update

    New member