Quantum Care - Luton

At Quantum Care we provide a range of services for more than 3,000 older people. We have many purpose-built homes across Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire and Essex, and we approach our work with one key objective in mind: helping older people to retain their independence and live life to the full. Every one of our residents has their own individual needs. A significant number are living with dementia and require specialist support. That’s why we work closely with family, friends and our teams of committed staff to ensure that we’re always providing the best possible standards of care. All of our homes run regular events and activities, planned by our dedicated teams of activity coordinators to help keep our residents active and engaged. We also maintain strong links with local communities through the delivery of respite care, enablement, intermediate care and day care.

Updated:
9 June 2016
Location:
East of England
Sectors:
Care
Local Alliances:
Luton Dementia Action Alliance

1. Action Plan

1. The National Dementia Declaration lists seven outcomes that the DAA are seeking to achieve for people with dementia and their carers. How would you describe your organisation’s role in delivering better outcomes for people with dementia and their carers?

Quantum care is committed to providing quality outcomes for people living with dementia.

We provide specialist Dementia Training for all our staff. We are accredited by Hertfordshire County Council to provide specialist dementia care. All staff working with people with dementia are trained in Person-First Dementia Care.

This training has four levels:

Dementia Awareness training which is delivered to everyone who works within the homes.The QCF  Level 2  Award in Dementia Awareness . The level 3 QCF Awareness of Dementia Award  is undertaken by unit managers and duty managers.NOCN accredited Level 3 Leadership in Dementia Care undertaken by Home Managers, Deputies and Regional Managers.

To support this training we now have a Rhythm of life excellence scheme where homes evaluate the experience of  poeple using our services against our Rhythm of life quality outcomes.

Each of our 26 homes has a Lead Dementia Champion committed to supporting homes to achieve quality outcomes

We also organise Dementia awareness events and talks in our homes to increase knowledge. These are open to the local community

We also currently have 4 Dementia Friends Champions committed to supporting the Alzheimer’s society with the Dementia Friends initiative.

2. What are the challenges to delivering these outcomes from the perspective of your organisation?

 Lack of appropriate access to early diagnosis and support Lack of appropriate use guidelines for prescribing and reviewing anti-psychotic drugs. Funding cuts which may compromise the quality of care for people with dementia. Current care industry image in the press that leads to lack of support from relatives and local communities. End of life: We recognise the challenge to be able to provide end of life care for people with dementia who are residents in our homes.

Member website

www.quantumcare.co.uk

2. Actions

  • Dementia training pathway

    Quantum Care is committed to providing detailed dementia training and our Dementia training pathway has been in place for over 10 years.

    We will continue to ensure that staff are trained to deliver person first care.

    Quantum Care are also committed to raising awareness for people who use our service and provide Dementia awareness talks and Dementia friends sessions to residents, relatives and the local community.

    Status:
    Delivery

    2014 - Second Quarter Update

    Update

  • Rhythm of Life Quality Outcomes for individuals living with Dementia

    Quantum Care has developed a set of outcomes and indicators that regards everyone as a unique individual. This unconditional positive regard means that good care is a right, not a privilege. We are always working to improve the well-being of those in our care living with dementia. We focus on the strengths of the individual and encourage what they can do as opposed to what they are no longer able to do. It is really important to try to continue each individual’s natural ‘Rhythm of Life’

    Choice in all aspects of daily life is be encouraged. We always try to remain alert to what people living with dementia are trying to say. We try to employ a range of skills to inform us of someone’s mood and feelings.

    There are many ways of looking at quality of care issues for people living with dementia, however, these standards seek to go beyond “care” to recognise how “quality of life” can be recognised, nurtured and celebrated.

    These outcomes seek to encourage those who use it to focus on the personhood of the Service user with dementia, and to seek to provide ways of preserving continuity in the future as the disease progresses.

    Each outcome, related indicator and measures can be personalised for each Service user’s unique lifestyle and preferences.

    The outcomes and indicators stated here relate broadly to all Service users with dementia. However, depending on the stage of disease progression, there may be differences in how the outcomes are achieved and measured

    In the early stages of the disease, people with dementia should be supported so that they can maintain the lifestyle, practices, and choices that they had prior to having the disease to the fullest extent possible.

    In the intermediate stages, the indicators, measures and good practices reflect the fact that the Service user is assisted so that s/he is able to maintain preferred lifestyles as much as possible. The Service user is given opportunities to do things with assistance and accommodation. . Finally, in later stages, the indicators, measures, and good practices respect previous choices that characterised the Service user’s life prior to significant disease progression.

    These outcomes can now be used as a self-assessment tool for managers to use with their staff to check how they are doing in delivering personalised support for people with dementia.

    This document asks managers to look at the practices, knowledge and skills of their self and their staff team and the experience of the person living with dementia and their family.

    Since 2014 Quantum Care has used these standards as an internal dementia excellence scheme. The iniative is currently being reviewd and revised. It has also been extended to everyone using our services, in recognistion that everyone is entitled to  excellent, person centered care.

    These outcomes incorporate all action from the national dementia strategy and recognised best practice from various sources.

    Quantum Care also recognises that the environment should support individuals living with dementia. We are  working to apply Kings Funds principles for supportive design for dementia across all  homes as they are redecorated

    Quantum Care has also been involved in several research programmes

     In 2013/14

    We have worked with North East London NHS trust to train and carry out research into cognitive stimulation therapy for people living with dementia.

    We have also been involved with the Royal College of Psychiatrists to participate in a trial of a new national Dementia Care Audit Tool, which is being developed to provide a measure of the care provided to people with dementia living in a care home setting.

    Quantum Care are currently taking part in a research project with the College of Optometrists.

    Research study title: The Prevalence of Visual Impairment in Peoplewith Dementia (The PrOVIDe Study).

    Status:
    Delivery

    2014 - Second Quarter Update

    Update

  • Quantum Care has a nurse practitioner who has developed end of life standards, policies and procedures

    Quantum Care has developed an End of life strategy that details the standards we wish to achieve to ensure individuals are able to talk about their choices, wishes, and preferences at the end of their life.

    Quantum Care is committed to ensuring that the care at the end of an individual’s life is still delivered in a person centred way.

    In 2014 we have launched new standards, guidance, documents and a plan of care that details and individuals preferences and choices.

    Our documents hope to start conversations about care at end of life as earlier as possible to ensure these preferences and wishes are achieved.

    We also now have end of life champions in each of our homes who are and will be trained to deliver the East of England end of life training programme.

    Status:
    Implementation

    2014 - Second Quarter Update

    Update