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North Manchester Black Health Forum (NMBHF)

(NMBHF) works vulnerable adults from marginalised communities living with mental health. It provides activities/support that improves health & wellbeing, reducing isolation and loneliness, increases empower and enablement, encourage healthy and independent living for people of our communities. Charity has 2 part time paid worker and 20 volunteers. On average 40 people pw attend various activities 80% from Cheetham and Crumpsall 20% from other North Manchester Wards. Objectives NMBHF provides person specific support services such as, Health & Well-being Group, Sweet Memories Dementia Cafe, Self- Care support, information and sign posting, peer support, volunteers program to local people affected by mental health needs such as , dementia, depression, anxiety, isolation, loneliness exasperated by external factors such as long term poor health, poverty, & unemployment due to lack of education & opportunities synonymous with inner city areas particularly affected are older people from BME Communities

Updated:
12 April 2016
Location:
North West
Sectors:
Health, Other, Charity, Voluntary Sector
Local Alliances:
Manchester Dementia Action Alliance

1. Action Plan

1. The National Dementia Declaration lists seven outcomes that the DAA are seeking to achieve for people with dementia and their carers. How would you describe your organisation’s role in delivering better outcomes for people with dementia and their carers?

1. The National Dementia Declaration lists seven outcomes that the DAA are seeking to achieve for people with dementia and their carers. How would you describe your organisation’s role in delivering better outcomes for people with dementia and their carers?

The project’s specific aim is to increase awareness of dementia & facilitate access to information to improve wellbeing of the individual & communities, improve public perceptions, promote healthier behaviours in the general public to prevent or delay the onset of dementia by increased early identification and awareness of dementia, seek and source appropriate services and support for healthy, informed and empowered communities. This preventative method will reduce the adverse impact of long term health conditions. The outcomes we will achieve are: 

 Working towards eradicating stigma attached to Dementia  Access to information/ sign posting in main community languages Volunteers/peers from similar background & speakers of main community languages Increased understanding and support for Dementia Friendly Communities Enhanced awareness of particular needs of people with dementia and their carers People with dementia and their carers/families will take up activities to improve their health and wellbeing with cafe activities People will likely to be received in public/social circumstances with understanding and tolerance for the limitations and problems determined by their condition. Reduced social exclusion through opportunities for social interaction  Opportunities to participate &  promoting social cohesion, autonomy, dignity and self esteem

2.  What are the challenges to delivering these outcomes from the perspective of your organisation?

2. What are the challenges to delivering these outcomes from the perspective of your organisation?

Cheetham, has a high proportion of population from BME communities & is relatively more deprived than Manchester as a whole & approx 12% of people are over 60 with multiple health conditions & proportion of population are from BME community with little knowledge of dementia.  Families/carers are not familiar with the dementia or its affect. It is perceived as part of growing old hence ignored at times and which can have an impact on their wellbeing.

There is little awareness about the nature of dementia highlighted by incompatibilities in language and culture (e.g. explanations rooted in religious beliefs). A reluctance to seek help is apparent for many and feeling of shame and stigma leads to isolation

Small charities such as ours are feeling the strain of the financial pressure & doing our best to meet the needs of the vulnerable adults of the marginalised communities of North Manchester

Member contacts

www.nmbhf.org.uk

Member website

www.nmbhf.org.uk

2. Actions

  • Working towards eradicating stigma attached to Dementia

    Make our service inclusive and actively involve people with dementia and their families. Challenge behaviours and raise awareness.

    Status:
    Implementation
  • Access to information/ sign posting in main community languages

    Actively seek information from various websites, in various medium ie; text, pictorial, audio, visual art form and fun and in community languages. Work in partnership with information and advice agencies to keep the information updated.

    Status:
    Implementation
  • Volunteers/peers from similar background & speakers of main community languages

    Actively recruit, train and support volunteers and peers from the local communities in order to provide bespoke information and support for people with Dementia, their families and carers so they are understood and can communicate with someone. These volunteers also will be advocate for dementia friendly communities and dementia friends.

    Status:
    Planning, Implementation
  • Raise the profile of the cultural needs of the BAME people living with dementia with the agencies

    There is still stigma attached to dementia and due to the barriers such as language and cultural and religious beliefs system most people living with dementia are not diagnose early stage to prevent long term effects.

    Working with the agencies and DAA members we advocate the needs of the BAME communities and to ensure that they access the support they need and that the services are pertinent to their needs.

    We do this in many arenas including the DAA meetings, local network meetings, sending information out to GP’s and Manchester City Council departments, Manchester CCG’s and so on

    Status:
    Being implemented