Jewish Care

Jewish Care is the largest health and social care charity for the UK’s Jewish community. With 1,000 staff and 2,500 volunteers, we run 70 centres and specialist services throughout London and the South East.

Updated:
31 August 2017
Location:
National
Sectors:
Care, Health

1. Action Plan

1. The National Dementia Declaration lists seven outcomes that the DAA are seeking to achieve for people with dementia and their carers. How would you describe your organisation’s role in delivering better outcomes for people with dementia and their carers?

Jewish Care is committed to achieving better outcomes for people with dementia and their carers through our commitment to excellence in our frontline services.  These include:

Advice and support line

Community support and advocacy

Carers support

Home Care 

Community Centres

Dementia Day Centres

Residential and Nursing Homes

Independent living/extra care

Respite Care

A dedicated Disability and Dementia team to provide education and guidance to Jewish Care colleagues working with people with dementia, and to the Jewish community.

All of our services serve Jewish people in London and the South East and we strive to work with person centred values.  The person, their unique history and individual rights to choice and control within the services we offer, are the primary focuses of our work.  Jewish Care's values (enabling, creativity, integrity, excellence and inclusive), reflect and support the outcomes outlined in this declaration.  We are committed to working closely with CCGs, local authorities and other agencies to ensure multi-disciplinary cooperation for the achievement of best outcomes.  We collaborate with Alzheimer's Society, Dementia UK, Skills for Care, Social Care Institute for Excellence, Bradford Dementia Group, other learning and development agencies. We are committed to developing creative and arts projects and some of our collaborations, in this respect, include The Wigmore Hall (Music for Life), Ladder to the Moon (Creative Hubs), Singing for the Brain, Dulwich Picture Gallery, London Sinfonia and Barnet Arts Depot. 

2. What are the challenges to delivering these outcomes from the perspective of your organisation?

Jewish Care identifies the following key challenges to delivering for people with dementia:

We need to lobby for appropriate funding for all services in order to deliver standards of delivery that can ensure the declaration's outcomes are achieved for people with dementia who are our service users.

Advocating on behalf of people with dementia so that they have real alternatives, for example being sufficiently supported to live in their own homes or the choice to move into high quality residential care or extra care/independent living accommodation.

Ensuring people with dementia and their carers have access to a wide range of services that are offer creative and flexible approaches.

Educating the work force (paid and unpaid) through the Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) pathways, continued support from the in-house dementia specialists and access to e-learning resources.

Respite care: Our challenge is to fully understand the needs behind people's requests for respite places and to provide facilities that match people's requirements.  

End of life: We recognise the challenge to be able to provide end of life care for people with dementia who are residents in our homes.  

Upgrading and building residential and nursing accommodation to best dementia design and guidelines.

2. Actions

  • Access to a skilled workforce

    Ensuring people with dementia and their carers have access to a skilled workforce, in a wide range of services, that are knowledgeable about dementia and can offer flexible approaches.

    Status:
    Implementation

    2015 - First Quarter Update

    Our care home in Hendon will close in June 2015 and residents and staff will move into a new home in Friern Barnet.  We have been working with residents. relatives, staff and volunteers to prepare for this exciting move.  One creative piece of work around this has been with Salmagundi Films.  Using iPad technology we have a created a short film called Daringly Able.  It follows the lives of six residents and featrues quirky digital portraits, bringing their stories to life, celebrating their skills and enabling a greater appreciation of the person they are today.  The participation of care staff in this project has been a strong development tool for them and has highlighted the potential to create opporutnities for meaningful lives for all.  Daringly Able can be seen on youtube.

    2014 - Third Quarter Update

    Our dementia training team is working collaboratively with or Disability and Creative Arts practioners to ensure we work with staff and volunteers to have holistic approaches.  Together we are building empowering and creative environments where people living with dementia can contribute and feel valued.

    2014 - First Quarter Update

    Jewish Care held and in-house conference for staff and volunteers with and attendance of over 100 people.  The conference theme was on prevention.  Holistic models of health and wellbeing were explored and included aspects of physical, emotional, social and spiritual life.

    We continue to offer centrally organised dementia courses for all staff and volunteers, as well as, coaching and mentoring in homes and day centres.

    2013 - Second Quarter Update

    On May 30th 2013 Jewish Care held our annual awards ceremony to celebrate and recognise the learnig achievements of our staff during the past year. 45 staff achieved their QCF level 2 & 3 qualifications (dementia pathway) and dementia certificates.  Our Disability and Dementia Team were presented with a "Made a Difference Team Award" for promoting wellbeing.

    On May 13th 2013 Jewish Care held a special ceremony to Celebrate twenty years of Music for Life Project in Jewish Care.  We have consistently held 3 eight week project of Music for Life for 20 years with 8 people living with dementia and 5 care staff on each project. This has been a fantastic intervention to ehance the wellbeing of people living with dementia and it has enabled staff to change their culture of care to a relationship focused model.

    2013 - First Quarter Update

    In December 2013 we introduced a new Memory Way Café in Redbridge (Dennis Centre).  This is Jewish Care’s second café and a third is planned for the Stamford Hill area.

    Our collaboration with The Alzheimer’s Society to run a Singing for the Brain group at Otto Schiff (Golders Green) has been very successful.  We are now embarking on a second group in  collaboration with The Alzheimer’s Society and Alyth Synagogue.  The group will take place in the synagogue in Temple Fortune. 

    A Music for Life Project was held at the Leonard Sainer Centre and concluded in December and currently another project is commencing at Clore Manor. 

    Preparations for our Creative Hub project with Ladder to the Moon are now complete and the project is ready to begin with the first hub commencing on April 8th at the Otto Schiff home.  The theme of the first hub will be Tea Dance and will culminate with a Tea Dance on June 2nd.  Further hubs will emanate from that to encompass ideas and wishes from residents and staff.

     Neil Mappes (Dementia Adventure) gave two inspirational talks to staff and managers from our centres and homes in February 2013.  We have plans to ensure ‘adventures’ will take place regularly this year.

    2012 - Third Quarter Update

    Jewish Care is actively supporting the movement for Dementia Friendly Communities. Gill Yentis is taking a lead on this in our organisation and has attended the June 25th roundtable seminar on dementia friendly towns and villages and the meeting of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Dementia on July 3rd.

    We see that our focus as an organisation will involve promoting this within the Jewish Community which is a religious and culturally based community rather than a geographical location. In the last 2 months Gill has given training on dementia to The Association of Jewish Refugees, the Pinner United Synagogue and Finchley Reform Synagogue and this has given her an opportunity to disseminate the concept.

    Jewish Care hosts a Singing for the Brain group at Otto Schiff (Golders Green). This group has established a regular membership of 8 to 10 couples and in the 2nd block of 12 sessions. It has a core group of volunteers supporting it launched on April 23rd and has growing membership.

    The dementia café (Memory Way Café), launched at Otto Schiff in April 2012, is flourishing with regular members reporting that it gives them informal support and an opportunity to socialise.

    We continue to advocate on behalf of people living with dementia to have opportunities to enjoy the outdoors and nature. Our social care coordinators had a training day with Dementia Adventure and are redoubling their efforts to ensure people living with dementia have the right support to avail of these opportunities. On August 22nd Jewish Care and Dementia Adventure jointly organised a joint outing to Capel Manor. 86 people took part from 9 homes and 2 day centres. It was a very successful day. The Social Care Coordinators will have a follow up one day workshop in September to review learning from this event and to plan strategies for the future.

    2012 - Second Quarter Update

    A group of our homecare team in the Redbridge area have completed a programme of training to provide a new service to people living with dementia. They can provide 2 hours of one-to-one activity, in the person’s own home, built around their life history and interests. This provides an alternative to day centres and in some cases compliments it. As more people move to personal budgets providing this kind of choice becomes increasingly important. In July 2012 this training will be rolled out to home care workers in North West London. Volunteers are also being enrolled to join this course.

    Jewish Care hosts a new Singing for the Brain group at Otto Schiff (Golders Green). This group was launched on April 23rd and has growing membership.

    A new dementia café was also launched at Otto Schiff on April 24th. It is called the Memory Way Café and has already established a core group of regular members.

    Music for Life completed an 8 week project at Vi & Jn Rubens House in Redbridge. 8 people with advanced dementia had the opportunity to find ways of expression through this project. The staff in the home were also able to use the project to develop and explore their own creativity and ways of communicating with the people who live in the home.

    Pam Turpin (ARUP employee and PhD student at UCL), has begun research at Vi & Jn Rubens Home to better understand the experiences of people with advanced dementia and multi-sensory impairments. Her research aims to explore interventions that can break through that potential “bubble of isolation” that can be associated with multiple disabilities.

    A group of senior staff from Jewish Care had a preliminary meeting with Andrew Chidgey (Alzheimer’s Society) to explore how we, as an organisation, can work within the Jewish community to develop dementia friendly communities.

    Jewish Care held preliminary meetings with and plans to collaborate with Dementia Adventure. We aim to ensure that Jewish Care’s service users living with dementia will have genuine choice and support to achieve their preferences to explore nature and adventure.

    Jewish Care is about to launch a new collaboration with Ladder to the Moon at the Otto Schiff home in Golders Green. This will be an extensive project to set up “creative hubs” in the home that will provide networking opportunities, to link people living in the home with the local community.

  • Continuing Dementia Care Mapping (DCM)

    Continuing Dementia Care Mapping (DCM) in dementia services.

    Status:
    Implementation

    2015 - First Quarter Update

    Eight senior staff members are booked to undertake Dementia Care Mapping and Person Centred Care training in April 2015.  They will join our existing team of mappers.  Every care home's manager has undertaken DCM training.  Maps are scheduled for 2015 in each home and action plans from maps inform training and development.  

    2014 - Third Quarter Update

    Dementia Care Mapping continues to be used in all of our care homes as a valuable and integral way of ensuring we continually assess our services from the perspectives of residents with advanced dementia.

    2014 - First Quarter Update

    On February 25th 2014 our team of Dementia Care Mappers met for their annual workshop to review their practice and skills in mapping.  Mappers renewed their commitment to carry out regular maps in all homes and day centres.  There was strong agreement that we will be pro-active in setting post DCM action plans and following them up. 

    2013 - First Quarter Update

    Dementia Care Mapping continues to take place and is used to enhance care practice.  Three senior staff are booked to receive DCM training in March to ensure our pool of Mappers remains strong. 

    2012 - Third Quarter Update

    During August and September 2012, through quality assurance surveys and Dementia Care Maps, we are consulting with people who attend our day centres for people living with dementia and their family carers. Feedback will be used to inform future programmes and ways of working at the centres.

    A schedule for Dementia Care Maps (DCM) is in place and the most recent took place in Lady Sarah Cohen in August 2012. The maps continue to provide us with a tool and process to hear the voices of people living with dementia and to advocate on their behalves.

    2012 – Second Quarter Update

    We have a schedule of Dementia Care Maps (DCM) to which care home and day centre managers have committed. The May meeting of Registered Managers had feedback from 4 care homes that have mapped in the first quarter of this year. Maps have been followed up with team meetings and action plans. DCM remains a very useful tool to help our staff and management to better understand what life is like for people in our homes and centres. Mappers, in turn, become the voice of the people they have observed during the maps.

  • Continue to access induction and ongoing training

    All paid and unpaid staff will continue to access induction and ongoing training provided by Jewish Care's specialist Disabilities and Dementia Service.  With the availability of the QCF dementia pathways from October 2011 Jewish Care undertakes to support staff working with people with dementia to achieve these qualifications.  (2010 - Develop routes of access to QCF dementia units for all Jewish Care staff working with people with dementia & from 2011 to 2014 to support and monitor the achievement of these qualifications). 

    Status:
    Implementation

    2015 - First Quarter Update

    The 2015 central training calendar for Jewish Care's Arts, Disability and Dementia Team includes: Inductrion on The Person Centred Approach to Disabilites and Dementia, Undersatnding Dementia, Understanding and resdonding to distressed behaviour, Becoming a dementia friend, Stroke awareness, Working with people in the advanced stages of dementia, Volunteers training on dementia, Food and meal times, Parkinson's disease awareness, Cognitive Stimulation Therapy, Diabetes awareness, Dual sensory loss, and Understanding and supporting people with hearing loss.  In addition to these courses, staff working in dementia environments take Level 2 & 3 QCF qualifications following the dementia pathway.  Creative arts projects such as Salmagundi Films, Music for Life, and Magic Me work in creative ways to involve and develop staff in shared situations with people living with dementia.  We take integrated approaches that combine disabiliy and dementia training and development.  

    2014 - Third Quarter Update

    Our Social Care Coordinators have recieved ILM qualifications in Volunteer Management.  This is very important as we aim to recruit more volunteers in dementia care settings.  Our Creative Arts Manager has also introduced several arts projects that aim to develop staff and volunteers as well as providing stimulating and creative experiences and opportunities for people living with dementia.

    2014 - First Quarter Update

    We are on target with this commitment.  All new staff and volunteers receive induction training on dementia.  New groups of staff have signed up for QCF dementia qualifications in dementia.

    2013 - First Quarter Update

    In addition to ongoing QCF, VIPS, centralised and in-resource training we have introduced a new My Life forum for staff and volunteer representatives from our homes and centres for people living with dementia.  This forum provides training on My Life (touch screen computers and software for people living with dementia) and aims to maximise the use of this technology in one to one and group settings.  The forum will also focus on developing life stories using the programmes available on My Life. 

    2012 - Third Quarter Update

    Jewish Care’s Disability and Dementia team are currently working with our training department to undertake a training needs analysis over the coming months with staff and volunteers across the organisation and from this to devise a strategy of dementia training and development from January 2012.

    A group of 18 homecare teams in the North West London and East London areas have begun a programme of training to provide a service of one-to-one activity, in the person’s own home, built around their life history and interests. The course will be completed at the end of September.

    2012 - Second Quarter Update

    In May 2012 Jewish Care is holding the annual Celebration of Success event. Staff from across the organisation will receive certificates for their success in training and education programmes. 21 staff have achieved QCF levels 2 & 3 with the dementia pathway. 2 senior staff attended a train the trainer course for the DOH funded Your Story Matters. They have gone on to train a further 18 people in the organisation. All are working with individuals on their life stories. The impact has been exciting for people living with dementia and for the staff. We have plans to further collaborate with The Life Story Network to further develop and build on this initiative.

    On May 18th we held a conference for staff and volunteers. 80 delegates attended “A day to be Inspired”. Workshops included themes such as: singing, jewellery making, dance and exercise, drama and reminiscence. It is also inspiring to report that a number of staff, on their own initiatives, are taking up degree courses on dementia with Bradford University.

  • Dementia Care Champions

    Continuing and developing a team of Dementia Care Champions in residential and nursing homes supported by senior leads for dementia who take on the role of Champion's mentors. Champions will use the VIPS framework to promote and measure high quality services (from now to 2014 and beyond). 

    Status:
    Being implemented

    2015 - First Quarter Update

    Jewish Care has scheduled 6 full day workshops for Dementia Care Champions this year.  We have 21 champions in total.  The February workshop explored care planning and in particular how to ensure it reflects the person being cared for, their character, aspiratons and abilities.  

    2014 - Third Quarter Update

    Our VIPS champions visited Jewish Care's Hyman Home in Brighton in August where they were able to learn from the team there about how they are introducing Eden principles, including a chicken run in the garden.  The champions also learnt about how the home has moved to ingegrate more participative arts into the daily routine of the home. They heard that several local musicicians visit once a week for an open session of imporvised music with residents, staff and all who choose to join in.  The champions left inspired to introduce new ideas to their homes, 

    2013 - First Quarter Update

    VIPS Champions will have 6 (1 day) workshops in 2013 covering the following topics: life history, complex behaviour, care planning, communication, reflective practice and front line leadership.

    2012 - Third Quarter Update

    VIPS champions continue to meet bi-monthly. The August 2012 meeting considered loss in all forms and in particular the kinds of losses that people with dementia and their carers face. In June the group explored other illnesses and disabilities that people may live with along side dementia.

    2012 - Second Quarter Update

    VIPS champions continue to meet quarterly. The April 2012 meeting considered emotional challenges that individuals living with dementia face when they live communally in residential homes. Through this network Champions gain the opportunity to get fresh insights from one another and can explore ways to come closer to the real experiences of people living in our homes.

  • To develop a range of respite options for people living with dementia

    Jewish Care will strive to develop a range of respite options for people living with dementia.

    Status:
    Being implemented

    2015 - First Quarter Update

    Jewish Cares three Day Centres for People Living with Dementia (Hendon, Edgware and Redbridge) continue to a very valuable service that often ensures family carers recieve a few hours of respite from caring duties every day.  Jewish Care subsidises both Local Authority and Self Funded places by about 60%.  A number of our Care Homes offer respite beds.  Our Community Support and Social Work teams work with family carers to support them find respite solutions that feel right for them. 

    2013 - First Quarter Update

    Jewish Care’s residential homes offer regular respite places.  Our day centres have reduced charges to be more affordable as this is a very valued service that many carers describe as fundamental to their ability to continue in their caring role.  Our Home Care services plan to extend the range of services they provide to include 24 hour live-in options (short and longer term).

    2012 - Third Quarter Update

    The organisation continues offer respite services in various forms including residential, day centre and home care. 

    2012 - Second Quarter Update

    Exploring ways to offer more choice for overnight respite care remains high on our agenda. Our panning meetings with home care and day care managers are endeavouring to include new initiatives that could compliment our existing respite facilities that are located in care homes.

  • End of life care

    Jewish Care commits to develop high standard end of life care. 

    Status:
    Implementation

    2015 - First Quarter Update

    Our main focus continues to build confidence for all community support workers and social workers, working with end of life whether it be dementia, cancer, disability etc.  The aim is to transfer this knowledge and skill to other Jewish Care colleagues, such as home care, independent living, day care, who work with people with life limiting illness in the community. We are also promoting the importance of working in an integrated/multi-disciplinary approach as best practice to enable person centred care. We are involved with the London Social Care Partnership – all boroughs to educate health and social care in working with end of life care.  We have designed a leaflet ‘End of Life Care – Have the Conversation’ which promotes putting your affairs in order and supports the Care Act 2014. Together with Skills for Care, we have designed a guide for non-Jewish health professionals to help understand death and dying from a Jewish perspective.

     

    2014 - Third Quarter Update

    Jewish Care continues to work closely with community and hospice services to ensure end of life care in our care homes is compassionate and appropriate to the needs and wishes of our residents and their families.  

    2014 - First Quarter Update

    This was a three-year practice based study funded by the King’s Fund and carried out in a large Jewish Care nursing home in collaboration with University College London (UCL).  The report has been published.

    Topics involved in training include the challenges of dementia end-of-life care; the physical process and symptoms of end-of-life; emotional and psychological needs at end-of-life; planning for end-of-life care; advance care planning and communication with residents and relatives; religion and spirituality at end-of-life; holistic care for people with dementia at the end-of-life; and a summary / reflective practice session.

    2013 - First Quarter Update

    Jewish Care’s Community Support and Social Work team have begun a project to apply a community skills model to good end of life care.  We will work closely with Skills for Care to document and report learning and progress through this model.

    The number (percentage) of residents dying in the homes (not being unnecessarily admitted to hospital) is increasing.  In 2010 68% of residents died in our homes with 47% being the lowest in any home and 92% in the highest.  In 2102 the 77% of residents died in our homes with 61% being the lowest in any home and 94% being the highest. 

    Two of our homes have achieved Gold Standard Framework and all the other homes are working towards this.

    End of Life Care in Advanced Dementia research carried out by  The Kings Fund, University College London and Jewish Care has now been published. 

    A number of factors were 'measured' before the intervention of a training programme with care and nursing staff and again after. The evaluation was done by a team from University College London led by Professor Gill Livingston.

    Below is a short summary of the main findings regarding the impact of the training programme:

    Less people with dementia died in hospital and more in the home: 47% died in the home before intervention and 76% after.

    There was a significant increase in the percentage of residents with dementia (n=50) who had a DNR instruction in their files- 14% before intervention rising to 73% after.

    The quality of Life of residents before death increased post intervention (the training) and Caregiver wellbeing tended to improve showing a change from being on average anxious and depressed to being well.

    In qualitative interview before intervention families said staff were not coping or communicating. After the intervention it was not said (at all). After intervention, relatives said they were pleased with the care and felt supported. This was not said before (at all).

    2012 - Second Quarter Update

    The University College London/Kings Fund research project that was based at Jewish Care’s Lady Sarah Cohen Home is currently completing its report and findings. This includes a training programme for staff working with people with advanced dementia at end of life. 

  • Residential and nursing accomodation

    Upgrading and building residential and nursing accommodation to best dementia design and guidelines.

    Status:
    Implementation

    2015 - First Quarter Update

    Four years after we presented our plans to the community and launched a £15.6 million capital fundraising project  and we are now preparing for the opening of the new Betty and Asher Loftus Centre at Friern Barnet. A unique care community offering residential and day care to around 250 people a day, including a new home to be named the Kun Mor and George Kiss Home. The Kun Mor and George Kiss Home will provide personal and dementia care.  The new home is set to welcome its first residents in late May/June.

    2014 - Third Quarter Update

    We are working closely with residents at the Ella and Ridley Jacobs Home and members of the Sam Beckman Centre in Hendon for their move to new premises in Friern Barnet early next year.  The new accomodation will be located in a campus with two other homes and will work with a strong ethos to involve and engage the wider community to ensure it will be a lively and inviting place to live and visit.  

    2014 - First Quarter Update

    Jewish Care is building a new residential care home for people living with dementia at Asher Loftus Way in Finchley.  This home will replace an existing home called Ella and Ridley Jacobs Home at Hendon.  The new home will provide a much higher standard of accomodation to people in keeping with our aspirations to provide people with the best to promothe their dignity and wellbeing. 

    The Sam Beckman Day Centre (Hendon) will also be relocated to a larger and up to date facility at Asher Loftus Way. 

    The home and day centre are due to relocate in February 2014.

    2013 - First Quarter Update

    Jewish Care has begun work on building a new home at Asher Loftus Way in North West London.  The new how will use best dementia friendly design and will accommodate 48 residents (in groups of 16).  The home will be situated beside 2 other homes and a day centre to forum a campus model that aims to be a hub of activity that will reach into the wider community.  

    2012 - Third Quarter Update

    The Dennis Centre for People Living with Dementia has moved into a remodelled, refurbished and state of the art premises within Vi and John Rubens Houses in Redbridge. The official opening, on the 20thJune, was attended by many members, relatives and colleagues from Jewish Care, Redbridge Social Services and other agencies.

    2012 - Second Quarter Update

    We have begun work to build a new care home in North West London, with 54 beds, adjacent to the Lady Sarah Cohen and Rosetrees homes. The home will accommodate people living with dementia. Additional services will be included on this site to enhance services and create a lively hub. A day centre facility will also be developed on this site. It is envisaged that the facilities will be completed within 2 years.

  • Assistive Technologies

    Jewish Care will strive to provide access in information to people living with dementia on assistive technologies. 

    Status:
    Implementation

    2015 - First Quarter Update

    Jewish Care has been working with Salmagundi Films to provide staff with training on the use of iPads for creative and interactive work with people living in our homes and with members of our day centres. We have commissioned a survery of our e-care resources and are working towards an e-care strategy.  We are working with other Jewish care organisations to pool knowledge and share information on AT.  We are investigating the possibility of developing  immersive spaces in our homes and centres.  

    2014 - Third Quarter Update

    We are investigating funding opportunities to introduce iPads into care settings to enhance one to one and small group activities.  

    2014 - First Quarter Update

    We are currently carrying out an audit of assistive technology in our homes, centres and other services.  We are working with the Jewish Deaf Association to carry out training on hearing awareness and the use of assistive technologies, including loop systems, across our workforce. 

    2013 - First Quarter Update

    All of our homes and centres for people with dementia have acquired My Life Software (touch screen computers and programmes for people living with dementia).  This is an exciting development and they are enriching activity programmes, social groups, and reminiscence.  The software id particularly useful for compiling high standard live stories. 

    2012 - Third Quarter Update

    In July 2012 The Sam Beckman Day Centre and The Leonard Sainer Centre have acquired My Life Software (Digital Reminiscence Therapy Software). A total of 4 homes/centres are now using this technology with very positive results. It is proving to break down barriers and people with dementia, staff, volunteers and relative finding common ground to enjoy programmes together. We have seen that the life story programme has been very successful gaining family involvement, and including children and teenagers helping their grandparents compile their stories.

    2012 - Second Quarter Update

    Innovations In Dementia (ID) are providing a number of training courses for staff and volunteers on the new on line AT guide for people living with dementia.

    The Dennis Centre and Vi & Jn Rubens home have begun to use My Life Software (interactive IT software for people with living with dementia). They have been collaborating with My Life Software to develop Jewish culturally specific programmes and will also take part in collating evidence of the impact of this product.

    Jewish Care was pleased to have been involved in supporting preliminary work with Studiohead (a design company) on developing a new IT networking site for the carers of people living with dementia. The concept is called Grouple and is still in proto-type. It was recently launched at the Design Council. Studiohead kindly presented the concept to a group of frontline community support and social work staff at Jewish Care.

  • Lobby for appropriate funding

    Jewish Care will continue to lobby for appropriate funding to provide relevant and high standard services to people with dementia and their carers. Whenever possible we will endeavour to lobby politicians, at local and national levels, and commissioners that good dementia care requires and is given a realistic budget.  In accordance with the personalisation agenda, we will endeavour to educate people on the true cost of high quality dementia services.  Jewish Care's campaign and fundraising department will continue to highlight services for people with dementia as a high priority with potential funders and benefactors.

    Status:
    Being implemented

    2015 - First Quarter Update

     Jewish Care’s community support and family carers’ services continues to provide information to people with dementia and their families to explore affordable options for accessing services. In addition, our fundraising campaigns continue to strive to inform of the possibilities people with dementia have to live fulfilling lives.  We are working with local Boroughs to understand the implications of Care Act and to ensure that our service users have access to the services that they are entitled to under the Act.  

    2012 - Third Quarter Update

    Jewish Care’s fundraising department continues to advocate on behalf of services for people living with dementia and to raise funds to support them. The community support teams work closely with people to advise and inform them of funding entitlements. We continue to collaborate with colleagues in Local Authorities and other agencies to ensure the voice of our clients and services are well represented.

    2012 - Second Quarter Update

    Jewish Care’s community support and family carers’ services continues to provide information to people with dementia and their families to explore affordable options for accessing services. In addition, our fundraising campaigns continue to strive to inform of the possibilities people with dementia have to live fulfilling lives. The Pesach (Passover) fundraising appeal was entitled Help us bring freedom to those living with dementia. This builds on the meaning of Passover when the Jewish people won their freedom from slavery. It successfully raised considerable funds to subsidise services for people

    living with dementia and at the same educated and promoted the ideas that people with dementia are entitled to:

    “The freedom to be respected”

    “The freedom to celebrate life”

    “The freedom to be me”