The Butterfly Scheme CIC

The Butterfly Scheme is a whole-hospital care response to people with dementia, but also supports people with other forms of cognitive impairment. Created by a family carer, it is also carer-led and the speaker team are all experienced family carers of people with dementia. The scheme works collaboratively with member hospitals; Butterfly Scheme Leads across the UK enthusiastically meet and liaise with the UK Coordinator in order to share experience, benefit from support and help shape any new initiatives within the scheme. People who wish to benefit from the scheme’s care response whilst in hospital opt to do so; it has virtually a 100% opt-in rate. Hospitals wishing to adopt the scheme approach the UK Coordinator via the website, often after recommendation by another member hospital. The scheme is cited in the National Dementia Audit Report’s recommendations to Dementia Leads and as an example of best practice by the RCN.

Updated:
10 February 2016
Location:
National
Sectors:
Health, Medical, Hospitals and Hospital Trusts

1. Action Plan

1. The National Dementia Declaration lists seven outcomes that the DAA are seeking to achieve for people with dementia and their carers. How would you describe your organisation’s role in delivering better outcomes for people with dementia and their carers?

The Butterfly Scheme promotes personal choice; people opt to use the scheme and that opt-in represents their request for a specific, personalised care response. The scheme was created when a family carer recognised that well-meaning but inappropriate dementia care in hospitals led not only to distress and danger, but also directly extended length of hospital stay. Family carers were distressed at having to leave the person they cared for in the hands of people who didn't know how to interact with them as an individual. Focus groups of people living with dementia and hundreds of family carers reported on their experiences in order to inform the creation of the scheme's care response. Hospital teams are taught insight and techniques to minimise distress and danger to hospital patients with cognitive impairment and avoid extending length of stay by their own actions or inactions, and they enjoy applying those skills. People without a dementia diagnosis but who benefit from the scheme's care response whilst in hospital are, where appropriate, referred for memory assessment as part of discharge planning, enhancing diagnosis rates. Dementia UK co-trained the speaker team and FindSignage is the scheme's signage provider. The RCN showcases the scheme.

2. What are the challenges to delivering these outcomes from the perspective of your organisation?

Continuity of hospital dementia care leadership is variable and when leadership changes hands, great support is needed in order to minimise disruption to the embedding process and maintaining quality of care delivery.

2. Actions

  • The scheme’s new evaluative system will be fully operational

    The evaluative system will enable member hospital leads to target both recognition of success and delivery of support where they are most appropriate, promoting evenness of delivery of the care response and the sharing of success where it can benefit other members of the team.

    Status:
    Delivery

    2013 - Fourth Quarter Update

    New member

  • The scheme’s new website (launch December 2013) includes areas for Butterfly Scheme Leads and Champions to share successes

    Member hospitals already work collaboratively, but the new website will facilitate the UK-wide sharing of success on specific care delivery topics in order to learn from each other’s strengths and innovative scheme-related projects.

    Status:
    Delivery

    2013 - Fourth Quarter Update

    New member

  • Supporting staff members at Butterfly Scheme hospitals by recognising their acquisition of dementia care skills; all staff meeting patients need those skills

    The scheme’s new website incorporates an opportunity for staff members to take a test, based on their Butterfly Scheme learning. If successful, they will receive a certificate.

    Status:
    Delivery

    2013 - Fourth Quarter Update

    New member

  • Share excellence from Butterfly Scheme teams UK-wide though a new Directory of Enhanced Practice

    The Butterfly Scheme works collaboratively across the UK and actively shares best practice between member trusts and health boards, but face-to-face meetings between Butterfly Scheme Leads are usually regional. Members are encouraged to suggest and develop appropriate additional services which work in conjunction with the Butterfly Scheme; the scheme's founder is pleased to endorse suitable initiatives. In order to allow all member trust leads to learn from and replicate these best practice examples from the whole of the UK, the scheme's founder created a Directory of Enhanced Practice, which is now in the possession of all UK Butterfly Scheme Leads.

    Status:
    Delivered

    2015 - First Quarter Update

    Teams are now actively considering whether any of the best practice initiatives working in other trusts might be abe to be replicated in their own.